Bizarre video shows moment around a hundred elderly Chinese shoppers run and fight to be first into Shanghai Tesco store

Up to one hundred eager shoppers run and fight to be first into a Shanghai Tesco store in a desperate bid to get their hands on goods.

The bizarre video – reminiscent of the Black Friday chaos in the West – was shot by Jonathan Meador and Jonathon Lim from a 14th floor balcony on the same street as the store.

But rather than a one off, these events happen every morning.

Up to a hundred eager shoppers run and fight to be first into a Shanghai Tesco store

Up to a hundred eager shoppers run and fight to be first into a Shanghai Tesco store

The group of between 60-100 elderly customers religiously queue up outside the store’s cast iron gates before it opens it’s doors around 9am.

Video – recorded over seven months starting last April – then shows a Tesco worker opening the gates before hordes of customers quickly rampage across the forecourt and into the store.

Many are knocked off their feet, while others fight and hit others who get in their way.

Many shun grabbing a trolley or basket in a bid to get into the store quicker than others.

Remarkably, these events happen every morning

Remarkably, these events happen every morning

Lim, a film director from Leongatha, Australia, said: “This happens every day. There isn’t really a concept of lining-up in China. Some people get quite aggressive, while for other’s it’s a big game.

“You see people pushing each other, but they laughing at the same time.

“I would estimate that between 60 to 100 people queue there, but it fluctuates from day-to-day.”

The duo’s project to objectively document the daily rush for morning food began in April when Jonathan Meador was sitting on his balcony having breakfast.

From the 14th floor of his apartment block, he noticed a large group of people and commotion.

After watching as the elderly people ran into the story, he decided to film it the next day.

After collaborating with Jonathon Lim, the pair began recording the events over several months.

Explaining the events, Meador added: “These people lived through some rough times in Chinese history.

“Exchanging food tickets for rice, one leaf of spinach per person – that kind of thing.

“Saving money and time is super important to them. Better to embarrass yourself or run someone over than go hungry.”

The duo have since entered the finished video into the Now And Then exhibition in Shanghai, where the work was sold to raise money for charity.