Remote Control Headache Cure

A mum-of-two who suffered 200 crippling headaches a day has been ‘cured’ thanks to a remote control that zaps her BRAIN. Carolyn Matheson’s chronic condition is known as ‘suicide headaches’ among doctors because of the maddening effect it has on patients. Waves of pain can strike Carolyn, 58, in either minute-long bursts of up to 200 a day or in agonising two-hour-long attacks. During the episodes they are so bad she can be unable to move or even talk.

A mum-of-two who suffered 200 crippling headaches a day has been 'cured' thanks to a remote control that zaps her BRAIN. Carolyn Matheson's chronic condition is known as 'suicide headaches' among doctors because of the maddening effect it has on patients. Waves of pain can strike Carolyn, 58, in either minute-long bursts of up to 200 a day or in agonising two-hour-long attacks. During the episodes they are so bad she can be unable to move or even talk.

A mum-of-two who suffered 200 crippling headaches a day has been 'cured' thanks to a remote control that zaps her BRAIN. Carolyn Matheson's chronic condition is known as 'suicide headaches' among doctors because of the maddening effect it has on patients. Waves of pain can strike Carolyn, 58, in either minute-long bursts of up to 200 a day or in agonising two-hour-long attacks. During the episodes they are so bad she can be unable to move or even talk.

A mum-of-two who suffered 200 crippling headaches a day has been 'cured' thanks to a remote control that zaps her BRAIN. Carolyn Matheson's chronic condition is known as 'suicide headaches' among doctors because of the maddening effect it has on patients. Waves of pain can strike Carolyn, 58, in either minute-long bursts of up to 200 a day or in agonising two-hour-long attacks. During the episodes they are so bad she can be unable to move or even talk.

A mum-of-two who suffered 200 crippling headaches a day has been 'cured' thanks to a remote control that zaps her BRAIN. Carolyn Matheson's chronic condition is known as 'suicide headaches' among doctors because of the maddening effect it has on patients. Waves of pain can strike Carolyn, 58, in either minute-long bursts of up to 200 a day or in agonising two-hour-long attacks. During the episodes they are so bad she can be unable to move or even talk.