Yours for £20,000! Secret underground nuclear bunker built during the Cold War is preppers paradise

For those of you fearful of a UK Ebola outbreak, a secret underground nuclear bunker has been put on the market for £20,000.

The sunken bunker, which was built near the village of Ashwell, in Hertfordshire, is completely hidden underground and was constructed by the Royal Observer Corps (ROC) as a military outpost in the throes of the Cold War.

Built in 1960 to house a team of three operatives, the 20 x 8ft bunker was designed to detect and monitor the aftermath of a nuclear attack.

The bunker was constructed by the Royal Observer Corps (ROC) as a military outpost in the throes of the Cold War

The bunker was constructed by the Royal Observer Corps (ROC) as a military outpost in the throes of the Cold War

Accessible only by a narrow shaft, the bunker’s main chamber features a toilet and a monitoring room with the ability to connect to an outside telephone line.

Nowadays, the bunker, originally built by the RoC as one of more than 800 posts throughout the UK, is uninhabited, but subject to planning approval, could be put to multiple uses with offers of more than £20,000 invited.

Surrounded by farmland 300 yards outside Ashwell, potential uses include a wine cellar, a short term holiday home and even a doomsday storage unit.

The bunker is on the market for offers in excess of £20,000

The bunker is on the market for offers in excess of £20,000

Business development director Mark Bradbury, 46, who bought the bunker in 2006 after it was sold to the Ministry of Defence in 1993, says although he’s not had any offers from preppers, the possibilities for usage are endless.

Mark, who lives in Ashwell, just a mile from the bunker, said: “The bunker has got a fascinating history, with its origins dating back to the height of the Cold War.

“However you can date the site’s military connections even further back to 1931 when the area was used as an outpost to spot foreign military aircraft.

“Back then, it was merely an observation platform on raised stilts, and it was often still used during World War Two for the same purpose.

“It wasn’t until 1960 that this role changed when the RoC moved their focus towards the nuclear threat from overseas.”

According to official RoC documentation, a team of three would be expected to live underground in the event of a ‘nuclear incident’, providing reports on the levels of radioactivity in the area.

Manned by members of the RoC, drawn mainly from the local community, it was their job to report their findings to the RoC headquarters in Bedford.

the 20 x 8ft bunker was designed to detect and monitor the aftermath of a nuclear attack

the 20 x 8ft bunker was designed to detect and monitor the aftermath of a nuclear attack

However the site was decommissioned on 30th September 1991 following the global nuclear de-escalation that spelled the end of the Cold War.

Mark said: “Despite its military history, I’ve actually considered converting the space into a bunker themed bed and breakfast.

“But I’ve just not had the time to commit to such a project.

“I’ve had a few offers come in for it so I’m sure someone with the time and resources will come and put it to use”

“I’ve heard nuclear bunkers are in demand by preppers looking for a place to hole up in the event of a disaster.”

Mark, who lives in Ashwell, just a mile from the bunker, said: "The bunker has got a fascinating history, with its origins dating back to the height of the Cold War."

Mark, who lives in Ashwell, just a mile from the bunker, said: “The bunker has got a fascinating history, with its origins dating back to the height of the Cold War.”