Wheelchair bound man taunted by letter telling him to tidy his garden

A severely disabled man has been left devastated after he received an anonymous letter from a neighbour telling him to tidy his overgrown garden.

Dean Wingate, 28, from Cleethorpes, Lincolnshire, has lived at the property for four years and needs daily help to manage his cerebal palsy.

Dean was left “hurt and frustrated” when the note landed through his door, unable to tend the garden himself as he is wheelchair bound.

Dean Wingate, pictured with his personal assistant, Penny Hogan, in the garden of his home which a local resident has complained about in an anonymous letter

Dean Wingate, pictured with his personal assistant, Penny Hogan, in the garden of his home which a local resident has complained about in an anonymous letter

The impersonal letter read: “To whom it may concern, please could the garden be restored to its tidy state as we try to keep the estate nice.”

Dean, who has been left reeling by the aggression, said: “I have been upset by the letter. I would do the garden if I could. It’s a real kick in the teeth.

Dean’s two carers, David Poole and Penny Hogan, were left outraged upon the discovery of the note, accusing Dean of letting down the

neighbourhood. It is only in the last year that the garden has become overgrown.

Dean said: “It’s not in David and Penny’s contract to have to look after the garden.”

David said: “It’s bad enough for disabled people round here.

“It would be interesting to turn the situation around and see how they would feel if they couldn’t go out and do it for themselves.

Dean Wingate, pictured with his personal assistant, Penny Hogan

Dean Wingate, pictured with his personal assistant, Penny Hogan

We have tried to do the garden a bit but our main priority is looking after Dean.

“We simply don’t have time to be gardening.

“If whoever sent the letter had knocked on the door and saw Dean they would have realised that he’s not able to do the garden.

“I think it’s just really petty and mean to be honest.”

Penny added: “I was very irate when I found out. I think it’s cowardly. If someone had a problem they could have just knocked on the door.

“We are very busy, but have bought a strimmer and try to do bits in the garden but Dean is the most important thing.”

In a cruel twist, Dean and his carers had already begun to make changes to the garden to install concrete paths to help create a wheelchair accessible garden.

David said: “The company we’re working with have been so good ¬†they were concerned when the found out about the letter and have been really helpful.”