Police work with foreign coppers to help catch European criminals on the roads

Police officers in the UK have joined forces with European coppers in a bid to tackle crime on our streets.

West Midlands Police are joined by officers from eight European countries including Lithuania and Poland this week, in a bid to clamp down on foreign criminals flouting the rules of the road.

West Midlands Police Superintendent Paul Keasey, said: "I'm delighted to welcome colleagues from police forces in Europe."

West Midlands Police Superintendent Paul Keasey, said: “I’m delighted to welcome colleagues from police forces in Europe.”

The European coppers will be helping West Mids Police overcome language barriers with overseas drivers and will be able to tap into their home country’s police systems to make sure fake details aren’t handed over.

West Midlands Police have joined forces with officers from eight European countries

West Midlands Police have joined forces with officers from eight European countries

West Midlands Police Superintendent Paul Keasey, said: “Foreign nationals who commit crime in the UK, and who use the road network to facilitate that criminality, may feel untouchable by UK police forces – but operations like this demonstrate our commitment to cross-border policing and that borders are no barrier to justice.

“I’m delighted to welcome colleagues from police forces in Europe. They will join us on operations and their support is invaluable: they will have instant access to intel systems at home and be able to question drivers in their mother tongue, assess their demeanour and attitude, and better detect if they are co-operating with officers.

“In the past we’ve arrested people for crimes ranging from motoring offences to human trafficking, money laundering, GBH and fraud, as well as motoring offences like driving with no insurance or licence.”

The European coppers will be helping West Mids Police overcome language barriers with overseas drivers

The European coppers will be helping West Mids Police overcome language barriers with overseas drivers