Is that hol-bean?Illustrator photoshops face of Rowan Atkinson characters onto artistic masterpieces with hilarious results

These hilarious illustrations have been created by photoshopping Rowan Atkinson’s comedic characters on to some of the most iconic artworks through history.

Pieces given the Blackadder and Mr Bean treatment, include Holbein the Younger’s portrait of Henry VIII and Rembrandt’s self-portrait.

The comedic creations are the brainchild of illustrator Rodney Pike who is from South Louisiana, USA.

Unsurprisingly Mr Pike decided that the enigmatic smile of the Mona Lisa needed some improvement.

Unsurprisingly Mr Pike decided that the enigmatic smile of the Mona Lisa needed some improvement.

The 52-year-old caught the bug for Mr Bean while living in the UK for three years in the 1990’s.

Rodney said: “First of all, I love art and especially the Masters.

“I think it just adds to the absurdity when working with such serious source material and Rowan Atkinson can make any situation funny no matter how absurd.

“I now have a collection of over 30 now.

“He’s always lots of fun and it is good therapy and a welcome break to the stresses of work sometime.”

Vanity by Frank Cadogan Cowper could have easily have been described as delusional if she looked like this.

Vanity by Frank Cadogan Cowper could have easily have been described as delusional if she looked like this.

Rodney started doing the Mr Bean illustrations four years ago when he entered his first one – a copy of an Army General entitled “General Bean” – into a Photoshop contest.

Each portrait can take him anywhere between three hours to three days to complete but he has spent up to two months on single piece.

Rodney said: “The one thing I make sure I do on these fun pieces is to do just that, have fun and learn along the way.

“This kind of work is where I develop new techniques and experiment with Photoshop.”

Holbein the Younger received some more attention from Mr Pike, manipulating his portrait of Thomas More.

Holbein the Younger received some more attention from Mr Pike, manipulating his portrait of Thomas More.