You camo see me! Rain forest’s most elusive creatures use camouflage to hide – can you spot them?

Rainforest critters are notoriously elusive – but can you spot them hidden in these camouflaged snaps?

From wood-like stick insects to bark coloured butterflies, these animals are having their own hide-and-seek competition.

One gecko expertly blends his skin with the browns and greens of his surrounding branch so well that the only obvious feature is his yellow eyeball.

Rainforest critters are notoriously elusive

Rainforest critters are notoriously elusive

Another crafty nymph not only uses the vivid green of a leaf to blend in, but also lines its spine up with one of the veins of the plant to almost completely disappear.

All of the pictures were taken painstakingly by Canadian forestry worker and photographer Paul Bertner from as far as the Amazon rainforest in South America to Borneo, in South East Asia.

These animals are having their own hide-and-seek competition

These animals are having their own hide-and-seek competition

Paul, 30, said: “Finding such well camouflaged creatures is often a result of luck.

“Experience can certainly be a factor in noticing slight irregularities in shape, movement, or appearance which can all be giveaways.

“Oftentimes it is a simple matter of putting in the time to search and discover.”

All of the pictures were taken painstakingly by photographer Paul Bertner

All of the pictures were taken painstakingly by photographer Paul Bertner

Paul spends up to eight months of the year travelling to a limited number of countries in order to catalogue the diversity in greater detail.

While out on treks for up to 18 hours a day, it can take Paul up to three hours to find a single camouflaged subject.

Paul, 30, said: "Finding such well camouflaged creatures is often a result of luck."

Paul, 30, said: “Finding such well camouflaged creatures is often a result of luck.”

Paul said: “There is no feeling quite like having photographed something that has never been captured or perhaps even seen before.

“What’s more this can sometimes come from a completely unexpected place.

“On my latest trip to Madagascar, a place of such exquisite diversity and where endemism can reach 90%, I never thought that, amongst lemurs and leaf-tailed geckos, my most interesting find would be a camouflaged slug.

“None of the guides, nor the experts I have consulted have ever seen or heard of before.”

It can take Paul up to three hours to find a single camouflaged subject

It can take Paul up to three hours to find a single camouflaged subject

Paul has a background is in cell biology and genetics, but only shifted his focus from his microscope to a camera after his first trip to the Peruvian Amazon.

Paul said: “I have loved wildlife from an early age.

“This passion has taken me from the Amazon, to Borneo and SE Asia to my most recent trip to Madagascar, the Congo and East Africa.

Paul has a background is in cell biology and genetics

Paul has a background is in cell biology and genetics

“It has only been in the last 2-3 years that photography has become an integral part of my travels.

“Particularly photographing behaviour, and previously un-described species.”

Paul said: "I have loved wildlife from an early age."

Paul said: “I have loved wildlife from an early age.”