Photographer captures amazing crocodile close ups

These snappy snaps were captured by a fearless photographer from just a few inches away.

Andy Murch, 47, had been hand feeding the crocs lion fish at Banco Chinchorro, off southeast Mexico.

The 2.5metre croc  offered Andy an amazing face-to-face encounter

The 2.5metre croc offered Andy an amazing face-to-face encounter

The 2.5metre croc was quickly attracted by the food up for grabs – offering Andy an amazing face-to-face encounter.

With just his lens standing between a nasty croc bite, Andy calmy carried on snapping – even as the croc reared its head out of the water and opened its jaws.

Fearless Andy Murch, 47, captured the shots from just a few inches away

Fearless Andy Murch, 47, captured the shots from just a few inches away

The experienced wildlife photographer and conservationist said: “The crocs regularly come out of the lagoon onto the reef flats to eat scraps that the local fishermen toss overboard.

They seemed to enjoy our lionfish too. They stayed around all day while we teased them up to our cameras.”

Thankfully, the hungry crocodiles seemed more interested in the bait than the humans swimming in the lagoon where around 700 of the habitat.

The experienced wildlife photographer said: "They stayed around all day while we teased them up to our cameras."

The experienced wildlife photographer said: “They stayed around all day while we teased them up to our cameras.”

Andy added: “The crocs were focused on the food rather than on us but they would occasionally try to flank us when we weren’t looking.

“Crocs are opportunistic hunters that will try their luck if you let them. Its important to keep your guard up.”

The photographer had been hand feeding the crocs lion fish at Banco Chinchorro, off southeast Mexico

The photographer had been hand feeding the crocs lion fish at Banco Chinchorro, off southeast Mexico

Andy spent six days living in a shack on stilts in order to snorkel with the crocs – a sacrifice he said was well worth the effort.

He said: “It was well worth the lack of creature comforts because we were able to get in the water with crocs almost everyday. It was a really intense shoot and instantly addictive.

“I’m looking forward to photographing a lot more crocodile species in the future.”