Hunting Whales

This is the dramatic moment a pod of gigantic whales dwarfed a boat as they hunted in perfect unison. The synchronised swimmers had a whale of a time as they were snapped in the waters of Frederick Sound in the north east Pacific Ocean, near Alaska. Pictured using a remarkable hunting technique known as bubble-net feeding, the 35-tonne beasts cleverly blow air at depths of 600ft creating a bubble net and trapping their prey near the surface.

This is the dramatic moment a pod of gigantic whales dwarfed a boat as they hunted in perfect unison. The synchronised swimmers had a whale of a time as they were snapped in the waters of Frederick Sound in the north east Pacific Ocean, near Alaska. Pictured using a remarkable hunting technique known as bubble-net feeding, the 35-tonne beasts cleverly blow air at depths of 600ft creating a bubble net and trapping their prey near the surface.

This is the dramatic moment a pod of gigantic whales dwarfed a boat as they hunted in perfect unison. The synchronised swimmers had a whale of a time as they were snapped in the waters of Frederick Sound in the north east Pacific Ocean, near Alaska. Pictured using a remarkable hunting technique known as bubble-net feeding, the 35-tonne beasts cleverly blow air at depths of 600ft creating a bubble net and trapping their prey near the surface.

This is the dramatic moment a pod of gigantic whales dwarfed a boat as they hunted in perfect unison. The synchronised swimmers had a whale of a time as they were snapped in the waters of Frederick Sound in the north east Pacific Ocean, near Alaska. Pictured using a remarkable hunting technique known as bubble-net feeding, the 35-tonne beasts cleverly blow air at depths of 600ft creating a bubble net and trapping their prey near the surface.

This is the dramatic moment a pod of gigantic whales dwarfed a boat as they hunted in perfect unison. The synchronised swimmers had a whale of a time as they were snapped in the waters of Frederick Sound in the north east Pacific Ocean, near Alaska. Pictured using a remarkable hunting technique known as bubble-net feeding, the 35-tonne beasts cleverly blow air at depths of 600ft creating a bubble net and trapping their prey near the surface.