Adorable retriever puppy with wonky wrists cured by twice-daily dose of walkies

An adorable puppy who had WONKY LEGS has been cured by a twice-daily dose of walkies.

Golden retriever puppy Kobi first showed signs of problematic paws when he was three-months old.

After being taken to one vet by owners Hannah Lilley and Adam Hazelwood, both 22, they feared he had irreparable bone damage.

Kobi suffers from carpal laxity syndrome (CLS) which means he needs lots of walkies

Kobi suffers from carpal laxity syndrome (CLS) which means he needs lots of walkies

After seeking a second opinion, vet Terry Dunne told the couple Kobi was suffering from carpal laxity syndrome (CLS).

For Kobi, like most excitable puppies, the cure was heavenly – as much exercise as he could handle, which meant lots of walkies.

Hannah Lilley and Adam Hazelwood, both 22, they feared the puppy had irreparable bone damage

Hannah Lilley and Adam Hazelwood, both 22, they feared the puppy had irreparable bone damage

Hannah said: “Kobi had been just like a normal puppy at first but then we noticed his wrists were constantly bent.

“As a result we thought it would be best to give him a rest so as not to put any more pressure on him.

“When we went to see Terry, he told us to do exactly the opposite and take him for walks twice a day.

“Within a week, his wrists had straightened out and he was back to normal.

“Now we’ve got a problem – we can barely keep up with him.”

Kobi first showed signs of problematic paws when he was three-months old

Kobi first showed signs of problematic paws when he was three-months old

CLS is a rare affliction which affects mostly male, rapidly-growing breeds like golden retrievers.

The main symptom is floppy wrists, assumed to be caused by the rapid bone growth outpacing that of the muscles, tendons and ligaments that support the joint.

Hannah said: "Now we've got a problem – we can barely keep up with him."

Hannah said: “Now we’ve got a problem – we can barely keep up with him.”

Terry, the vet at Fairfield Veterinary Centre in Hinckley, Leicestershire, said: “It is a common misconception to try and support the abnormal joints with dressings or casts.

“This has exactly the wrong effect – by protecting the joint in this way only makes it weaker.

“In order for a joint to be restored to good health it must be kept mobile and exercised providing the opportunity for the muscles, tendons and ligaments to develop and mature.”

Now, at five-months-old, Kobi is undergoing standard training, but mum Hannah, who is an occupational therapist, hopes he will become a PAT dog to help people with brain injuries.