Adorable paralysed pooch learns to walk for the first time – and finally finds forever home

This adorable paralysed pooch is learning to walk for the first time – and has finally found his forever home after one of his doggy therapists fell in love.

Lt. Dan swims during a physical therapy session

Lt. Dan swims during a physical therapy session

Lt Dan was born without the use of his back legs after being abandoned as a puppy – and after the poorly pooch was taken to Woof Gang rescue centre in Chicago, US, disabled animal specialists Bialy’s Wellness Foundation (BWF) took over his care.

The mutt has been having physical therapy at a canine rehabilitation facility in Chicago since November last year – and he has made a miracle transformation.

Dan using his wheels in November 2015

Lt Dan using his wheels in November 2015

From a poorly pup who had to drag himself around on the floor, Lt Dan is well on his way to walking for the very first time.

Erin Kowalski, from BWF, has been fostering the five-and-a-half month old pooch for four months – until one of his therapists fell in love and decided to adopt him.

Lt. Dan undergoing physical therapy in December 2015

Lt. Dan undergoing physical therapy in December 2015

Erin said: “We’re not sure if Lt Dan’s paresis is a result of a congenital abnormality or if it happened during the birthing process.

“We just know that when he was born he was unable to use his back legs.

Lt. Dan exercises his legs during a therapy session

Lt. Dan exercises his legs during a therapy session

“Lt Dan has come a long way in his therapy – he used to have severe hind limb paresis, and needed to move around by dragging his back legs behind him.

“Now he is upright, taking individual steps, and walking!

Lt. Dan and his new family

Lt. Dan and his new family

“It was a high probability that one of the therapists who worked with him would fall in love and adopt him – and that’s just what happened.

“It was the perfect match – Lt Dan now has a physical therapist for a dad, and can continue to work on his hind limb function his entire life.”