Adorable baby orangutans go to school for their first day!

PIC BY INTERNATIONAL WILDLIFE RESCUE / CATERS NEWS - (PICTURED: A wheelbarrow of adorable Orangutans.) - Summers over and its back to school for everyone- including these adorable baby orangutans! Orangutan school is the first stage of rehabilitation for all rescued baby orangutans, and this footage shows the first day of school for new classmate Didik. Didik, who is 18 months old, has just recovered from surgery removing a bullet from his shoulder and in the video he is seen catching the school-wheelbarrow with the other babies eager to start their day of playing and climbing at school. The school is at the International Animal Rescue Orangutan Rehabilitation Centre in Ketapang, in Indonesian Borneo. SEE CATERS COPY

Summer’s over and it’s back to school for everyone- including these adorable baby orangutans!

Orangutan school is the first stage of rehabilitation for all rescued baby orangutans, and this footage shows the first day of school for new classmate Didik.

Didik, who is 18 months old, has just recovered from surgery removing a bullet from his shoulder and in the video he is seen catching the ‘school-wheelbarrow’ with the other babies eager to start their day of playing and climbing at school.

The school is at the International Animal Rescue Orangutan Rehabilitation Centre in Ketapang, in Indonesian Borneo.

Like human children, school began at the start of September and this footage was filmed on the 1st September this year.

A spokesperson from International Animal Rescue said: “It’s always daunting to be the new boy in the group and Didik was a little nervous at first.

PIC BY INTERNATIONAL WILDLIFE RESCUE / CATERS NEWS - (PICTURED: A wheelbarrow of adorable Orangutans.) - Summers over and its back to school for everyone- including these adorable baby orangutans! Orangutan school is the first stage of rehabilitation for all rescued baby orangutans, and this footage shows the first day of school for new classmate Didik. Didik, who is 18 months old, has just recovered from surgery removing a bullet from his shoulder and in the video he is seen catching the school-wheelbarrow with the other babies eager to start their day of playing and climbing at school. The school is at the International Animal Rescue Orangutan Rehabilitation Centre in Ketapang, in Indonesian Borneo. SEE CATERS COPY

Summers over and its back to school for everyone- including these adorable baby orangutans!

“It didn’t take him long to get used to his new surroundings and he was soon venturing on to the climbing frame and up in the trees with his friends climbing and swinging confidently in the branches.

“Baby school is one of the first stages of rehabilitation for rescued baby orangutans. We currently have about 50 baby orangutans in baby and pre-school.

“They start like Didik under the watchful eye of their babysitters. Some are very clingy at first as in the wild they would be clinging to their mothers.

“Gradually they grow in independence, copying and learning from each other and with gentle encouragement from the babysitters who themselves have had training in tree climbing.

“The babies will generally stay in school for months, even years, depending on their level of progress.

PIC BY INTERNATIONAL WILDLIFE RESCUE / CATERS NEWS - (PICTURED: An adorable Orangutan climbs a ladder at the enclousre.) - Summers over and its back to school for everyone- including these adorable baby orangutans! Orangutan school is the first stage of rehabilitation for all rescued baby orangutans, and this footage shows the first day of school for new classmate Didik. Didik, who is 18 months old, has just recovered from surgery removing a bullet from his shoulder and in the video he is seen catching the school-wheelbarrow with the other babies eager to start their day of playing and climbing at school. The school is at the International Animal Rescue Orangutan Rehabilitation Centre in Ketapang, in Indonesian Borneo. SEE CATERS COPY

Orangutan school is the first stage of rehabilitation for all rescued baby orangutans, and this footage shows the first day of school for new classmate Didik. Didik, who is 18 months old, has just recovered from surgery removing a bullet from his shoulder and in the video he is seen catching the school-wheelbarrow with the other babies eager to start their day of playing and climbing at school.

“All the orangutans are routinely observed and assessed by the babysitters and once they have been judged confident, independent, and skilful enough, the infants move up to forest school.

“By this time they are building nests in the trees rather than on the ground and are able to stay out day and night.

“Once they have passed forest school, they are placed on an artificially created pre-release island. It will be several years before Didik and the other babies reach this level though.”

PIC BY INTERNATIONAL WILDLIFE RESCUE / CATERS NEWS - (PICTURED: One of the baby orangutans is fed by an IWR worker.) - Summers over and its back to school for everyone- including these adorable baby orangutans! Orangutan school is the first stage of rehabilitation for all rescued baby orangutans, and this footage shows the first day of school for new classmate Didik. Didik, who is 18 months old, has just recovered from surgery removing a bullet from his shoulder and in the video he is seen catching the school-wheelbarrow with the other babies eager to start their day of playing and climbing at school. The school is at the International Animal Rescue Orangutan Rehabilitation Centre in Ketapang, in Indonesian Borneo. SEE CATERS COPY

The school is at the International Animal Rescue Orangutan Rehabilitation Centre in Ketapang, in Indonesian Borneo.

Alan Knight, who works with the International Animal Rescue added: “It is always wonderful to see a baby orangutan take to the trees for the first time and Didik has made a very encouraging start.

“With the support of the babysitters and the other orangutans around him, we’re sure he will continue to make great progress.

“It is particularly heart-warming to see these young apes learning to play and have fun after suffering so much trauma and sadness so early in their young lives.”