Stunning pictures show lost underwater wrecks from the two World Wars

These stunning pictures show the incredible undisturbed wrecks left from the two World Wars and now buried deep beneath the sea.

Crucial military vehicles from World War One and Two have laid to rest under the sea bed, undisturbed until now.

Photographer Steve Jones, 43, from Aberdare, South Wales, took these amazing shots while on a dive at Malin Head, off the coast of Donegal, Ireland.

The relics of the two great wars are thought to be military vehicles

The relics of the two great wars are thought to be military vehicles

Steve, who has been diving for 29 years, said: “We only had about 30 minutes down at the deepest point of each dive, as there is a very real risk of getting the bends.

The four wrecks captured in Steve’s stunning images show HMS Audacious, SS Justicia, SS Laurentic and Empire Heritage, which were all sunk during World War One and Two.

The underwater wrecks, which date back to WW1 and WW2, are buried deep beneath the sea

The underwater wrecks, which date back to WW1 and WW2, are buried deep beneath the sea

Steve said: “Malin Head is one of the most special places I’ve ever dived. The sailors that died on these ships during the two world wars made the ultimate sacrifice to ensure the vital supply routes between the UK and USA remained open.

“HMS Audacious was one of the most powerful warships the world had ever seen at the time. It was sunk by a mine during WW1 and lies in 65 metres of water. It was amazing to see it so up close.

“Another WW1 liner SS Laurentic was en route to the USA she struck 2 mines and sunk in 40 m of water, killing over 350 of her crew.
“In her holds were 43 tons of gold ingots to pay for war supplies.

“Recovery of the gold was top priority but to this day 20 bars remain unaccounted for, which are worth nearly £6 million.

The wrecks shown in the pictures include HMS Audacious, SS Justicia, SS Laurentic and Empire Heritage

The wrecks shown in the pictures include HMS Audacious, SS Justicia, SS Laurentic and Empire Heritage

Steve said: “Due to the exposed location and depth, only divers trained in the use of mixed gas (use of helium mixed in with our breathing gas) can operate safely at these depths.

“Malin Head has become legendary among this community of “technical divers” as having some of the best wrecks in the world. It is an amazing feeling to be able to photograph some of these amazing historical wrecks”.

Photographer Steve Jones, 43, who captured the shots, said: "Malin Head is one of the most special places I've ever dived."

Photographer Steve Jones, 43, who captured the shots, said: “Malin Head is one of the most special places I’ve ever dived.”