Stunning drone photographs of the new seven wonders of the world

A group of enthusiastic drone photographers have shot a series of stunning images high above the NEW Seven Wonders of the World.

Machu Picchu, Peru

Machu Picchu, Peru

AirPano, a Russian-based photography group, spent years travelling to the likes of the Great Wall of China, Petra, the Roman Colosseum and Machu Picchu.

The breath-taking panoramic shots highlight the grandness and splendour of the timeless locations, which were selected via a process that received more than 100 million votes.

As there are numerous interpretations of the world’s wonders, AirPano’s members decided to opt for the ‘New7Wonders’ list, an initiative that was launched in 2001.

Colosseum, Rome Italy

Colosseum, Rome Italy

Two-hundred different landmarks were voted on, with the seven chosen wonders being announced in 2007.

AirPano began shooting their series in 2011 and visited their final location in 2013.

Since they began shooting it has become increasingly difficult to gain drone access at such historic landmarks, thanks mainly to their increased usage.

On their site, the panoramic images allow visitors to travel around the locations, zooming in on specific elements of the wonders.

Christ The Redeemer, Rio de Janeiro

Christ The Redeemer, Rio de Janeiro

Despite the crispness of the images, Sergey Semenov, a photographer with AirPano, revealed some of the locations were difficult to shoot.

At the Taj Mahal they required special shooting permission, as the last photography shoot from a helicopter took place in 1997.

The group had to wait two months for permission, before being granted two days of shooting access.

Taj Mahal, India

Taj Mahal, India

The group continue shooting the other finalists from the wonders competition, having also visited finalists such as Timbuktu, Sydney Opera House and the Statue of Liberty.

Sergey said: “People love it – we received hundreds of positive comments.

“We’re pleased to give all people opportunity to see Wonders of the World from above, to give them feeling of a personal presence on the spot.

The Great Wall of China

The Great Wall of China

“All these places we photographed by using radio controlled helicopters – drones.

“Sometimes it wasn’t very easy to shoot there, because special permission is required in some of these locations.

“As drones become more popular, it got almost impossible to use it in many places.”