STICK ‘EM UP! ADORABLY ENERGETIC CUB PICTURED BOUNCING AROUND JUST LIKE TIGGER

By Michael Scott


This super cute cub looks like Tigger as it bounces around full of energy.

The adorable baby snow leopard bears a striking resemblance to the much-loved Winnie-the-Pooh character as it jumps around and even appears to use its tail as a spring – just like Tigger.

The five-month-old cub was spotted at the Triple D Ranch in Montana, the USA by Shayne McGuire from California who said she was taken aback by how much energy the youngster had.

She said: “Being a young cub, Mystique is all about playtime.

Pic by Shayne McGuire/Caters News

“She has a furry toy that she chases and ‘attacks’, she loves jumping up or out and landing on it.

“I know that younger animals have a lot of energy but I was taken aback by the height she could jump to and how far she could jump out.

“This gives one a better idea of how they bring down prey in the wild. She is energetic and very agile.

“I had a smile on my face and missed a few jumps, just wanting to watch her play. Not many people can say they have been able to witness something like this.

“I didn’t know I had captured that moment. I showed friends and the word Tigger was what all of them said when viewing it.

Pic by Shayne McGuire/Caters News=

“To be able to witness and young snow leopard, with no bars or cage, enjoying itself in the field, will be a moment I get to carry with me.

“Just watching the hunting instincts kick in, reminds one that when she gets older, I will not be this close again.”

Snow leopards are poached for their fur and the Triple D Ranch runs an accredited breeding program to help keep the endangered animals alive.

The snow leopard is a large cat native to the mountain ranges of Central and South Asia.

It is listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species because the global population is estimated to number less than 10,000 mature individuals and decline about 10% in the next 23 years.

As of 2016, the global population was estimated at 4,500 to 8,745 mature individuals.

Pic by Shayne McGuire/Caters News