Pine Dining

Enjoying a sandwich while hanging precariously from the branches of one of the world’s tallest trees wouldn’t be most people’s idea of the perfect picnic. But for these daredevil explorers grabbing some lunch at the top of a 350ft tree is just a normal day at the office. For climbing the world’s tallest and probably oldest trees is a challenge botanist Steve Sillett, 45 and his wife Marie Antoine face almost every day as they study the tallest forests on earth.

Enjoying a sandwich while hanging precariously from the branches of one of the world's tallest trees wouldn't be most people's idea of the perfect picnic.  But for these daredevil explorers grabbing some lunch at the top of a 350ft tree is just a normal day at the office.  For climbing the world's tallest and probably oldest trees is a challenge botanist Steve Sillett, 45 and his wife Marie Antoine face almost every day as they study the tallest forests on earth.

Enjoying a sandwich while hanging precariously from the branches of one of the world's tallest trees wouldn't be most people's idea of the perfect picnic.  But for these daredevil explorers grabbing some lunch at the top of a 350ft tree is just a normal day at the office.  For climbing the world's tallest and probably oldest trees is a challenge botanist Steve Sillett, 45 and his wife Marie Antoine face almost every day as they study the tallest forests on earth.

Enjoying a sandwich while hanging precariously from the branches of one of the world's tallest trees wouldn't be most people's idea of the perfect picnic.  But for these daredevil explorers grabbing some lunch at the top of a 350ft tree is just a normal day at the office.  For climbing the world's tallest and probably oldest trees is a challenge botanist Steve Sillett, 45 and his wife Marie Antoine face almost every day as they study the tallest forests on earth.

Enjoying a sandwich while hanging precariously from the branches of one of the world's tallest trees wouldn't be most people's idea of the perfect picnic.  But for these daredevil explorers grabbing some lunch at the top of a 350ft tree is just a normal day at the office.  For climbing the world's tallest and probably oldest trees is a challenge botanist Steve Sillett, 45 and his wife Marie Antoine face almost every day as they study the tallest forests on earth.