Photographer spends decades capturing vibrant time-lapses of fairground rides making them look like kaleidoscopes

 

PIC BY ROGER VAIL / CATERS

These kaleidoscopic images show the incredibly vibrancy of fairground rides through the use of time-lapse photography.

Roger Vail spent more than four decades building up his collection of images, which jump out at the viewer because of the unique movement paths of certain rides.

While everyday Ferris wheels create solid, bright circles, the likes of spinning and swinging ridges provide completely different visions altogether.

The photographer shot his first fairground ride in this style in 1971, going on to capture nighttime images on exposures that ranged from 30 seconds to 30 minutes in duration.

PIC BY ROGER VAIL / CATERS

Roger, 72, from north of Monterey, California, USA, travelled to the likes of Chicago, San Francisco and even Italy to build out his collection, which he has never given a name to.

Instead, the photographer, a self-confessed minimalist, named his images after the rides themselves – they include Yo Yo, Zipper and Wave Swinger.

Roger’s works are currently on display as part of the “Summer Selection” exhibit at the Joseph Bellows Gallery, in San Diego, California, USA, which runs through August 26, 2017.

Roger said: “I discovered early on that almost all carnival rides last around 3 minutes.

PIC BY ROGER VAIL / CATERS

“So, I would adjust my exposure settings so that they were all close to that time to get the full effect of the moving patterns of light.

“What kept me going for so long was the fun in not knowing what they would look like until the film was developed.

“The view camera technology I have used is fundamentally the same technology that Ansel Adams used 70 years ago.

“In my opinion, it is a beautiful and complete craft such as it is.”