Photographer Shoots Incredible 50,000 Individual Images Of The Moon To Make One Stunning Giant Photo

This inventive snapper took backyard astrophotography to the next level, shooting a ginormous, clear photo of the moon without using high-tech equipment – but instead by combining an incredible 50,000 IMAGES.

Andrew McCarthy’s beautiful shot of the moon shows the top half lit while the bottom fades to darkness.

PIC BY ANDREW MCCARTHY / CATERS

Rather than using high-tech equipment costing tens of thousands, Andrew simply used two regular cameras to capture the different parts of the moon.

And because of the photographer’s unique shooting technique, the final image, shot earlier this month, measured a whopping 81 megapixels in size.

Andrew, from Elk Grove, California, said: “The closer you look, the more you see.

“Every pocket of the night sky has virtually endless complexity and beauty, even the parts that appear empty.

PIC BY ANDREW MCCARTHY / CATERS

“The moon is simply a closer example of the beauty that exists everywhere in this universe, and we are lucky to have it.

“The way it hangs there in space is a constant reminder of the powerful physics at play that maintain our very existence.

“It is quite humbling.”

Sections of the moon were captured in what Andrew calls ’tiles’ – images stitched together using Photoshop before the best and clearest shots were chosen, averaging out the likes of blurring.

PIC BY ANDREW MCCARTHY / CATERS

For example, the lit part of the moon was made up of 25 ’tiles’, each consisting of 2,000 images.

Of these 2,000 images, the best 50 percent were selected to make up the stack for that section of the image.

As well as this mega-image, Andrew has received plaudits in the past for his other space photographs.

Speaking of the reaction his giant shot has received, Andrew said: “The reaction has been nothing short of overwhelming.

PIC BY ANDREW MCCARTHY / CATERS

“I have been inundated with praise from thousands of people.

“It has been an extremely rewarding and validating experience.

“My goal from my photos has been to impart a sense of wonder onto others that I experienced when I first looked through a telescope.

“In my opinion, many of our petty problems in this world could be solved by simply having a more global perspective, one that could be found simply by appreciating our unique place in this world.”