Out of this world photos of sulphur springs look like landscapes of far off planets

Despite looking like it could be from a far off galaxy in a Sci-Fi film, this landscape is a natural sulphur spring in Ethiopia.

With its vibrant yellows and deep dark browns the ground appears to be possessed by some sort extra-terrestrial life form but is just created by high levels of salt.

Neat hills of solid salt similar in shape to waxworks rise nearly as tall as the mounds of dirt next to them.

High levels of salt create the extraterrestrial contours in the land

High levels of salt create the extraterrestrial contours in the land

Photographer Bradley Ambrose, from New Zealand, battled oppressive heats up to 53degrees Celsius to capture the landscapes at Dallol, Ethiopia.

The photographs of the multi-coloured landscape were taken in the Afar region of Ethiopia by New Zealand photographer Bradley Ambrose.

Bradley said: “Experiencing Dallol is like stepping onto another planet.

Bradley said: "Experiencing Dallol is like stepping onto another planet."

Bradley said: “Experiencing Dallol is like stepping onto another planet.”

“Another planet where the only thing that is the same is the air you breathe but everything else is trying to kill you!

“The heat, sulphur, acidic waters and some of the ground was quite thin to the point where I thought I would break through and boil myself to death.

“There was so much colour and beauty that I wasn’t sure that I could do it justice photographically.”

Bradley is from Rotorua in New Zealand where they have their own geothermal springs, but was still taken aback by the Ethiopian landscape.

The pictures of the multi-coloured landscape were taken by  Bradley Ambrose

The pictures of the multi-coloured landscape were taken by Bradley Ambrose

He said: “Due to its high salt levels and other minerals, Dallol was an extremely concentrated area of micro activity and was definitely brighter and more varied than what I’ve seen before.

“There is a high concentration of salt as the entire area is lower than sea level and was once upon a time underwater.

“We were told that the ‘lakes’ we drove across to get there, the salt was kilometres deep in places.

“Besides the searing heat, the first thing that I noticed was the smell – very similar to rotting eggs, which reminded me of my childhood playing in Rotorua.”