It’s a bit of an eye-saw: world’s biggest saw slices through mountains of coal

Mining through a mountain is no easy task – that is unless you own the world’s biggest SAW.

Weighing in at a whopping 45,000 tons, the monster piece of machinery can slice its way through virtually anything, including huge mountains made entirely of coal.

The giant saw weighs a whopping 45,000 tonnes

The giant saw weighs a whopping 45,000 tonnes

In fact, the staggering saw, known as a bucket wheel excavator, is so big it takes 27 miners just to operate it at any one time.

Naturally, the world’s biggest saw can be found at the world’s biggest single coal mine, the Bogatyr Mine near the city of Ekibastuz in Kazakhstan.

Through mountains made of coal, the monster machinery can saw its way through anything

Through mountains made of coal, the monster machinery can saw its way through anything

Incredibly, the diameter of the saw spans nearly 12 metres in length, roughly the same height as a four storey building and a single machine can cost up to £66 million ($100 million) to produce.

But don’t about worry getting run over any time soon as its hulking mass means it can only travel one mile every three hours.

The machine is called a bucket wheel excavator

The machine is called a bucket wheel excavator

Russian photographer, Alexander Popov, 34, managed to snap the colossal contraption whilst on an assignment to take pictures of the Kazakhstan mining industry.

Alexander said: “I have never seen a machine as big as this one although I have seen many powerful machines in the past.

“I got to see the saw as part of photography assignment for the Kazakhstan mining industry, I couldn’t believe its size when I got up close.

the same height as a four storey building, a single machine can cost up to £66 million

the same height as a four storey building, a single machine can cost up to £66 million

“It is used in the mining of coal and can actually mine 4,500 tons of coal per hour, it really is an extraordinary piece of equipment.

“I was not scared to get so close but was more in awe of its power and design.”