Isle of light: photographer captures awe-inspiring beauty of milky way scattered across the night sky over the Isle of Wight

There are few places in Britain you could take these spectacular pictures – the iridescent colours of the Milky Way illuminating the night sky.

But one photographer has found a perfect spot to capture the vibrant constellations in almost cinematic definition – the pitch-black countryside of the Isle of Wight.

The Isle of Wight is known for its low levels of light pollution - an environment conducive to astro photography

The Isle of Wight is known for its low levels of light pollution – an environment conducive to astro photography

Astro-photographer Jamie Currie, 35, has been taking pictures of the phenomenon, which contains between 100 and 400 billion stars, in locations across the Isle of Wight since 2013.

Known for its low levels of light pollution, the idyllic island is a hotspot for stargazers to capture the immense beauty of the disk shaped galaxy, which cannot be distinguished properly with the naked eye.

Jamie Currie, 35, has been taking pictures of the phenomenon in locations across the Isle of Wight since 2013

Jamie Currie, 35, has been taking pictures of the phenomenon in locations across the Isle of Wight since 2013

Jamie, a former Royal Marines Commando from the Isle of Wight, said: “I have always been interested in the night sky and wanted to try something different with my camera. Astro was the way to go.

“The pictures were all taken on the Isle of Wight over the last 12- 18 months, it’s turned into a bit of a labour of love.

“The Isle of Wight it is very good for astro-photography due to the little light pollution on the south coast of the Island.”

In what looks like a rainbow of stars arched across the night sky, one photograph shows the glowing band looming over St Catherine’s Oratory on the southerly tip of the Island.

Jamie, a former Royal Marines Commando from the Isle of Wight, said: "The Isle of Wight it is very good for astro-photography due to the little light pollution on the south coast of the Island."

Jamie, a former Royal Marines Commando from the Isle of Wight, said: “The Isle of Wight it is very good for astro-photography due to the little light pollution on the south coast of the Island.”

While another depicts Bembridge Lifeboat station below an explosion of luminous colours.

According to Jamie, most of his shots are taken using a Canon 6D camera over a 30 second period with very high ISO levels to capture the Milky Way, which is just visible with the naked eye.

However Jamie, who wants to travel to Yellowstone Park to capture the star-studded sky, says low light pollution is crucial to capturing the galaxy on camera.

He said: “I have been very interested in taking photos of the Milky Way over the last two years.

“The light pollution on the Isle of Wight allows me to pull as much possible light into the camera to capture the billions of stars in the galaxy.”

“It’s a truly astounding phenomenon, I would like to travel to the Yellowstone national park in the future to capture the Milky Way at its very best as there is very little light pollution.”