Incredible 360 Degree Images

This is one artist whose photographs really make him feel on top of the world.. as he climbs up 70m high electricity pylons to take them. Daredevil photographer Wouter van Buuren scales pylons, cranes, bridges and even skyscrapers in a bid to take the vertigo-inducing snaps. He then spends months meticulously arranging the photographs to make up one huge landscape – giving the effect of a looking down on the whole world.

This is one artist whose photographs really make him feel on top of the world.. as he climbs up 70m high electricity pylons to take them. Daredevil photographer Wouter van Buuren scales pylons, cranes, bridges and even skyscrapers in a bid to take the vertigo-inducing snaps. He then spends months meticulously arranging the photographs to make up one huge landscape - giving the effect of a looking down on the whole world.

This is one artist whose photographs really make him feel on top of the world.. as he climbs up 70m high electricity pylons to take them. Daredevil photographer Wouter van Buuren scales pylons, cranes, bridges and even skyscrapers in a bid to take the vertigo-inducing snaps. He then spends months meticulously arranging the photographs to make up one huge landscape - giving the effect of a looking down on the whole world.

This is one artist whose photographs really make him feel on top of the world.. as he climbs up 70m high electricity pylons to take them. Daredevil photographer Wouter van Buuren scales pylons, cranes, bridges and even skyscrapers in a bid to take the vertigo-inducing snaps. He then spends months meticulously arranging the photographs to make up one huge landscape - giving the effect of a looking down on the whole world.

This is one artist whose photographs really make him feel on top of the world.. as he climbs up 70m high electricity pylons to take them. Daredevil photographer Wouter van Buuren scales pylons, cranes, bridges and even skyscrapers in a bid to take the vertigo-inducing snaps. He then spends months meticulously arranging the photographs to make up one huge landscape - giving the effect of a looking down on the whole world.