Don’t look down! Vertigo-inducing images of newly-discovered ice chasm taken from the air

PIC BY Gunilla Lindh / CATERS NEWS 

These images of a newly-discovered ice chasm in the Icelandic wilderness are truly mesmerising – but they might just bring on a bout of vertigo.

Glacier guides and explorers Gunilla Lindh and Florian Ledoux took this extraordinary series of pictures from both above and below ground level after waiting for months for the perfect photography conditions.

PIC BY Gunilla Lindh / CATERS NEWS

Gunilla, who took pictures by drone, has spent years guiding people on the glacier known as the Grand Canyon, discovered a new huge chasm that had formed about two kilometres from the glacier snout.

She said: I have spent several years guiding on this glacier and although a glacier is constantly changing, started to feel that I knew this glacier as my own back yard.

 

PIC BY Florian Ledoux / CATERS NEWS

Capturing drone footage of the same area that I knew so well, allowed me to discover the place from a completely different angle.

It put the size in a very different aspect and allowed me to get many shots of climbing and ice features that would otherwise not be possible because of the terrain and safety aspects

Capturing drone footage of the same area that I knew so well, allowed me to discover the place from a completely different angle.

PIC BY Florian Ledoux / CATERS NEWS

It put the size in a very different aspect and allowed me to get many shots of climbing and ice features that would otherwise not be possible because of the terrain and safety aspects

“The photos were taken on a glacier tongue in South Iceland, called Solheima jökull. It’s a 100-metre long natural canyon shaped by water.

“At the south end of the canyon, the water that is creating it, drains down into a large, seemingly bottomless, Moulin.

PIC BY Gunilla Lindh / CATERS NEWS

“We rappelled onto this plateau and discovered a very narrow drainage tunnel which we managed to explore to a depth of 200 metres, before the space became too narrow to squeeze through any further.

“Basically, a it’s a beast that could swallow you into its black depths.

PIC BY Florian Ledoux / CATERS NEWS

“To rappel down and explore the narrow depths and bottom of this Moulin had been an objective for us for many months, however its critical for safety that the conditions are right. When temperatures are too warm or when heavy rains have been present the glacier is very wet and impromptu waterfall can form and cascade down the Moulin.

“And in winter, heavy snowfall can build up large deposits of snow around the edges of the Moulin, which can at any time dislodge and create an avalanche into the Moulin that would instantly injure or kill any climber inside.”