Best selfie ever? Stunning time-lapse selfie includes volcano, moon and milky way

A photographer has snapped what could be the best selfie ever – capturing himself in front of an active volcano, the moon AND Milky Way.

Mauna Kea, Hawaii, USA

The once in a lifetime shot. Mauna Kea, Hawaii, USA

Shane Black’s stunning image sees him staring down into the molten pit below, a layer of fog coating the horizon and the Milky Way illuminating the night sky.

PIC BY SHANE BLACK / CATERS NEWS - (PICTURED: Mauna Kea, Hawaii, USA.) A photographer has snapped what could be the best selfie ever - capturing himself in front of an active volcano, the moon AND Milky Way. Shane Blacks stunning image sees him staring down into the molten pit below, a layer of fog coating the horizon and the Milky Way illuminating the night sky. In the distance, the light from another volcano, Kilauea, can be seen breaking through the mist, while the moon lights up the opposite corner of the sky. The phenomenal shot was taken near the summit of Mauna Kea, on the Big Island of Hawaii, USA, nearly 14,000ft high. SEE CATERS COPY

PIC BY SHANE BLACK / CATERS NEWS – (PICTURED: Mauna Kea, Hawaii, USA.) A photographer has snapped what could be the best selfie ever – capturing himself in front of an active volcano, the moon AND Milky Way. Shane Blacks stunning image sees him staring down into the molten pit below, a layer of fog coating the horizon and the Milky Way illuminating the night sky. In the distance, the light from another volcano, Kilauea, can be seen breaking through the mist, while the moon lights up the opposite corner of the sky. The phenomenal shot was taken near the summit of Mauna Kea, on the Big Island of Hawaii, USA, nearly 14,000ft high. SEE CATERS COPY

In the distance, the light from another volcano, Kilauea, can be seen breaking through the mist, while the moon lights up the opposite corner of the sky.

The phenomenal shot was taken near the summit of Mauna Kea, on the Big Island of Hawaii, USA, nearly 14,000ft high.

In order to create the once-in-a-life panoramic, Shane, 26, stitched together 23 individual frames, each shot with the shutter open for 15 seconds, allowing as much light in as possible to enter the lens.

Meteor Shower, Orlando, Florida, USA

Meteor Shower, Orlando, Florida, USA

Shane, from Ohio, has also travelled America photographing millions of stars in alternative locations.

He hopes to travel internationally next, and has his sights on moving to the Pacific North West.

He said: “Adding a human figure into a photo really helps to show the scale of the scene and it also gives the viewer a sense of being there for themselves, as that person.

Crater Lake, Oregon, USA

Crater Lake, Oregon, USA

“I love stargazing and being humbled by the universe around us.

“It reminds me how small I am and this photo depicts that very well.

Mono Lake, California, USA

Mono Lake, California, USA

“While the naked eye can only see so much, I was blown away by all the detail that the camera was able to pick up.

“Thanks to camera technology these days, long exposure photographs are able to capture so much – it’s always so great to see what the camera captures after a long exposure.

Goblin Valley, Utah, USA

Goblin Valley, Utah, USA

“Seeing how the stars and Milky Way move across the sky during a time-lapse really puts it into perspective that the earth is just spinning through space.”